6 Projects to Teach Your Kids Computing with Linux This Summer

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Scratch isn’t a programming language that’ll give you a lucrative programming career. But that’s fine. It’s not intended for that. Rather, it’s used to teach the basic concepts behind computer science.  computer science computer science computer science computer science computer science

Scratch is a visual programming language, so rather than typing code, you drag-and-drop building blocks in order to create simple programs. This presents a simple, approachable way to teach your child about how software is built, and programming concepts like conditionals, iteration and recursion.

But don’t let the simplified nature of Scratch fool you. Just because it’s easy, it doesn’t mean you’re restricted in what you create. People have built everything from games – like a multiplayer pong game – to animations – like a whimsical greeting card – to interactive art.  computer science computer science computer science computer science computer science

codelinux-pastel

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And once you’ve finished your masterpiece, you can share it with the welcoming Scratch community online, who can provide feedback and encouragement through ‘likes’ and comments.  computer science computer science computer science computer science computer science

And if you get bored there, you can use Scratch to build Arduino-based Internet of Things projects. Neat, right?

Control Your Home With the Raspberry Pi

The Raspberry Pi is a tiny, affordable, credit-card sized computer capable of running Linux. Incidentally, it’s also capable of running a stripped-down version of Windows 10, designed for building Internet of Things projects.

The Pi is a versatile beast, having repeatedly shown itself to be capable of running anything from art installations, to web servers, to even Minecraft servers.  computer science computer science computer science computer science computer science

One application for the Raspberry Pi that caught my eye was James Bruce’s home automation project, which uses a broad smorgasbord of technologies to control his house’s lighting.

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