5 Things You Need to Know About the Hour of Code

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The Hour of Code movement is a grassroots movement that has already introduced 100 million students to the basics of computer science, but they are looking for more event organizers! In an effort to reach 100,000 classrooms worldwide, they will be giving away a gift card to Amazon.comor Microsoft’s Windows Store as a thank you to all organizers— all you have to do is register your event. When you sign up to host an Hour of Code, you will also receive access to new tutorials and the new volunteer match program, designed to help you find volunteers in your area.

If you haven’t thought about organizing an event, you should. Block out December 7 to 13 on your calendar. This global movement is helping to bring coding to students (and adults) in an accessible, meaningful and fun way. There are over 42,000 events in more than 180 countries and resources in 40 different languages. Before you sign up your event check out these five things you need to know about the Hour of Code. computer science computer science

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We’ve all heard a lot about the Hour of Code over the past couple of years. Until recently, I didn’t know much about it – what I had heard was that it was an effort to get students, or anyone really, to spend one hour learning the basics of programming. But how are they learning it? Who is teaching them? And at the end of the hour, what do they know that they didn’t know before? computer science computer science computer science computer science

1. The Origins of HOC

The Hour of Code originated in December 2013 during Computer Science Education Week. Code.org launched the ‘Hour of Code Challenge’ online, inviting students to try and complete tutorials using Blockly, a programming language similar to Scratch. The program had huge support from influential figures – everyone from Bill Gates to President Obama got behind it, and in the end over 20 million people participated. computer science computer science computer science computer science computer science computer science computer science computer science

Today, the Hour of Code (which I’ll refer to as HOC) has moved into classrooms across the world. According to its website, there are over 8,079 (*note: since this originally posted there are now over 42,000 events) events around the world in over 180 countries. To date, over 100 million students have participated, and girls in particular are being given a greater opportunity to learn programming than ever before. computer science computer science

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