7 Stupid Things Programmers Do That Drive Users Crazy

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Programmers (hopefully) do their best when coding applications, but nobody is perfect. And that’s definitely evident when you look at some of today’s websites, desktop programs, and smartphone apps.

Whether by accident, due to management requirements, or because of a lack of understanding of what users really need, programmers often end up creating annoying interfaces for users. Let’s take a look at some of the stupid quirks that baffle, infuriate, and make us laugh. computer science computer science computer science

1. Unhelpful Error Messages

There’s perhaps no element with more potential to confuse, anger, or otherwise elicit a strange emotional response than the error message. We’ve looked at some of the most ridiculous error messages in Windows, but these aren’t limited to just that platform.  computer science computer science computer science computer science

You’ll find all kinds of examples of poor error messages; let’s look at a few common types. Many of these examples come from Microsoft’s extensive page on the do’s and don’ts of creating error messages, but apply to messages everywhere. computer science computer science computer science computer science computer science

Too Much Technical Information

In this kind of error message, the dialogue provides technical details that confuse the user. If an error message sound like it was written by a robot, the average user has no idea what any it means — so they’re not going to read it. Thus, they have no starting point for fixing the problem.

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A secondary type of this error occurs when programmers use the end-user dialog box to report programming errors. Errors that contain information about memory violations or variable problems are completely useless to the user and will only confuse them further.

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Blaming the User

Another common mistake of error messages is making the user feel at fault. Even if they actually did perform an unwanted action, they shouldn’t feel bad because they made a mistake. Using harsh language is a bad idea and will frustrate the user more than they already are.

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Being Too Vague

Why create an error message if you aren’t going to describe the issue properly? When a user hears the error sound and sees An unknown error occurred, what are they supposed to do? If you provide no information about why the error happened, they’re going to click OK and pretend nothing happened.

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Windows 10 infamously featured this type with its Something happened error when updating to a new version.

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